It’s The Window’s Fault: A Lesson on Accountability

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Following what I learned in the Bible, it's not my fault, but the windows. That's right, the windows. What did it do? Check out the story.

Remember the story of Adam and Eve after they ate the forbidden fruit? God asked them to confess their sin, but they started a habit we still practice today: they blamed everyone else. Adam blamed God and Eve, and Eve blamed Satan (Gen 3:12-13). Well, today I did something foolish, but it wasn’t my fault. It was the window’s fault.

As I left for work, I grabbed something to drink and took it with me. It wasn’t a terribly hot day, so I rolled the windows down in the van (Ram Van) and left the air conditioner off. Once I arrived at work, I parked the van and proceeded to roll them back up. The passenger’s window went up fine, but the driver’s side was stuck. I left the key in the ignition with the battery on so I could try to find out the problem. I looked inside, played with the window switch, but to no avail. After five to ten minutes of frustration, I gave up, grabbed my drink, closed the van door, and went inside. I spent the day praying the rain that fell earlier would not return.

Two and a half hours later I needed to get something out of the van that I left there. On my way out, I checked my pockets to see which one had the keys. Neither one did. Suddenly it hit me, they are in the van—with the battery on and the window down! I might as well have put a big sign on the windshield reading, “Please come take me.”

But you see, it’s not my fault. The window distracted me. It made me lose focus on the keys. Yes, I remembered the Dr. Pepper I brought with me, but the window made me forget the keys.

By the way, my wife doesn’t buy that logic, and I’m sure neither does God.

How easily we can get distracted from life’s important details. But before we blame someone or something else, consider this thought: every time we point a finger at someone else, there are three fingers pointing back at us. So maybe the window isn’t to blame, but it sure is easy to think so.

About John L. Rothra
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